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20130124
20130201
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
republicans. he will give political cover to some who may want to go up against president obama. >> oh, i think that's right. i think that's one quadrant, but, of course, you had john waern, who is also a republican, former chairman of that committee, who strongly defended hagel and his views, and sam nunn on the democratic side. there are a lot of former chairman around that may have other issues. people aren't looking at thad cochran. thad cochran came out as the first republican to issue p public support for hagel, and he was one vote away from beating trent lott for senate majority leader some years ago. you have leaders. this is -- as john mccain said, this is not a neat difference among friends. there are deep idealogical differences about world view and america's place in the world, and i think that those opposed to hagel are trying to get a bandwagoning effect happening. i've talked to senator shumer and others who don't see that happening. i have talked privately to a couple of republican senators who are keeping their powder dry right now, but they're not quite ready to jump in
with obama? why can't politics be a matter of belief and honest disagreement, not hatred? why the sick little intramurals we saw today? we begin with senator jeanne shaheen of new hampshire. i want you to watch this back-and-forth between john mccain and the witness today, chuck hagel. let's take a look. >> were you correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? >> my -- >> yes or no. >> my reference -- >> can you answer the question, senator hagel? the question is, were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. >> well -- >> i would like to answer whether you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no answer -- >> well, let the record show you refused to answer this question. now, please go ahead. >> if you would like me to explain why -- >> i actually would like an answer. yes or no. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. i think it's far more complicated than that, as i have already said
political risk in opposing immigration reform than in supporting it. >> ifill: indeed this new effort comes on the heels of last year's election in which president obama won seven of every ten hispanic votes in his victory over republican mitt romney. senator john mccain of arizona said that's the key reason his party must now get on board. >> elections. elections. the republican party is losing the support of our hispanic citizens. and we realize that there are many issues in which we think we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, but this is a preeminent issue with those citizens. >> ifill: mccain also said the country cannot continue to deny citizenship to children brought to the u.s. illegally. president obama has said immigration reform is at the top of his second term agenda. today his spokesman jay carney welcomed the senate agreement. >> this is a big deal. this is an important development. this is in keeping with the principles the president has been espousing for a long time, in keeping with bipartisan efforts in the past, and with the effort this president believes has to
of the road in terms of the political spectrum values. i think he has a very strong record as a patriot of this country. he has proven that. and he's also someone who fits very well with president obama and soon to be secretary of state john kerry. i would hope people would judge him on the whole body of his record as a public servant all the way back when he was a sergeant in the vietnam war. to me i think he would serve with distinction and honor. >> i agree. he made that point in his opening statement which was to judge him on the entirety of his record of his life, which obviously is very exemplary. but do you think the republicans will end up filibustering him? there would be some suggestions that ted cruz is going to put a hold on him. >> i sure hope not. i'm a career person. i serve both republican and democratic administrations. we can't litigate the past over and over again. if you think of what is ahead for the next secretary of defense, how do we get out of afghanistan with honor effectiveness and redeem the valor of our soldiers who have serve there had? how do we face the c
connell. >> some have said it was it was indelicate of me to suggest that our top political priority over the next two years should be to deny president obama a second term. but the fact is, if our primary legislative goals are to repeal and replace the health spending bill, to end the bailouts, cut spending and shrink the size and scope of government, the only way to do all of those things is to put someone in the white house who won't veto any of these things. >> after that, democrats worried republicans were trying to annihilate the democratic party, in part by trying to destroy unions, the most vivid example of that, wisconsin. the republican governor successfully pushed a bill that stripped collective bargaining rights for most public unions. ohio and michigan followed scott walker's lead with mixed success. and now it seems the tables have turned. now if you believe boehner, the democrats want to annihilate the gop. so the talkback question for you, do you agree with boehner? will obama try to annihilate the republican party? facebook.com/carolcnn, or tweet me @carolcnn. i'll be right back.
been identified. and the morning you see the obama administration interested in action rather than politics, you're going to have a different kind of tone. but we also should be looking at two things. what are the psychiatric problems and to what degree does the federal privacy law make it almost impossible to identify people who have psychological problems? i suspect we're going to find this tragic situation in alabama right this minute involves somebody with a deep psychological problem. and then, second, i think we have to look at, what is happening in big cities, where it is, in fact, largely pistols that are involved, and largely gangs that are involved? >> let me ask you about another big issue that we've been talking about a lot this week, the issue of immigration. there's been a big bipartisan push, you know, this week, including republicans, marco rubio, john mccain, talking about this comprehensive immigration reform. but, clearly, not all republicans are on board with this latest push. listen here to senator david vitter. >> i love and respect marco. i think he's just am
of smarts? >> well, it's interesting. he's been referred to as the republican barack obama. i don't know about that particular analogy, but clearly his bona fides as a political thinker were established in the ivy league and he seems to be, at least according to dana's chronically of his career, very, very shrewd. i would say in addition to him being an operator, he is also an identify l ideologue. i think he's going to have to smarten up a little biabout the direction the tea party is going to continue to go in terms of its vise grip control over the republican party because i'm not sure that can hold through immigration reform, through the series of different financial fiscal debt talks that have to occur. i think he will be smart in what he does. he has eclipsed palin. he's an ideologue in such a way that his charisma is not sort of dwarfed by that. his charisma shines through even though he has a right wing ideolo ideology. very complicated and interesting character and obviously we're going to be seeing a lot more of him. >> as you mention, i do think he presents himself with -- you
obama holds this iconic position in american politics. what is left could not be more dangerous. host: from emporia, kan., on our republican line. caller: good morning, professor turley. just to underscore the conversation that is taking place to this point -- i am conservative so i live my part of the country were used to tend not to worry about things but recently i read a piece by julia engwin in "the wall street journal" about a program called the national counter- terrorism center. there is a recent change in rules. if there was reasonable suspicion of terrorist activity, they could sneak into records but the rules have changed and basically, at this point, they can dig up the records on any american for any reason. they are looking for suspicious activity. among the things they look for is whether people have posted international symbols, which i have, whether they have traveled, which i have done, va medical records, which i have, and i find these things really troubling. i love my country but when i see stuff like this going on, i find it troubling particularly when the protec
to have cars from the 1950s. it's another thing when your whole political ideology is coming out, is 50 or 60 years old and it's been proven not to work. >> does the travel ban stay in place for the entire second term of obama? we'll see. >>> well, we're just a few minutes away now from the start of chuck hagel's confirmation hearing. we're going to bring that to you live as soon as it starts. plus, another one of president obama's cabinet picks hits a little bit of a bump in the road. democrats publicly criticizing cia nominee, john brennan. my gaggle's going to join me next early as we prepare for hagel and other stuff. first, a look ahead at the president's schedule. a quiet day for him on the record, with the focus on chuck hagel. but vice president biden, by the way, goes up to capitol hill to meet with senate democrats on guns. you're watching "the daily rundown," only on msnbc. people love our potpourri parties. it's a smell of a good time. this is the juniper! oh that is magical. [ male announcer ] when you combine creamy velveeta with zesty rotel tomatoes and green chiles, you'
enough for him, bill, to defeat the republicans politically or even based on policy which you would expect from any president. for president obama it is about pounding the republican party into oblivion. bill: let me talk about how republicans react to this in a moment, monica. emily, get on record, what do you think about the dustbin of history from speaker boehner? >> i think it is disappointing john boehner would go to the extreme talking points. he has not always been an extreme guy. he has been in the house for a long time. look to president obama, look actually at his record. when we moved into the sequester fight in early december, the first thing out of president obama's mouth he would look at any good idea regardless who it came from. he has consistent history of trying to work across the aisle. bill: does he now? bipartisan? >> the ideas that he a lick tated in the inauguration speech, those are american values. these are not traditionally democratic values. republicans used to be able to talk about these issues. it is really the republican party that has left the center,
that all americans can support. there's no political ideology that finds this cruel loss of life acceptable. i was incredibly pleased to see president obama include as part of his comprehensive plan to prevent gun violence a bill that i first introduced in 2009 with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly called "the gun trafficking prevention act," which would be the first federal law to define gun trafficking as a federal crime and event scofers illegal guns from being -- scores of illegal guns from being moved into the hands of criminals. we have thousands of laws but effectively none of them are directly focused on preventing someone from driving from one state to another state with a
of late, but today an associated press raised these concerns saying, quote: in politics power resides in the moment. any immediate economic setback or the perception of one could weaken obama's clout or at least distract him as he carefully tries to put his imprint on initiatives dealing with immigration and gun violence. let's talk about it with a.b. stoddard, an associate editor and columnist for "the hill." a.b., the president has been mostly talking about immigration and gun violence lately, and yet we still have an unemployment rate at 7.8%. if labor force participation were the same as when he took office, it would be over 10%. we've got a fall in our nation's economic output in the last quarter, and you've got new, um, shrinking of consumer confidence. those are some pretty big issues. does that threaten to derail what the president wants to accomplish? >> well, it will. you mentioned before whether or not these issues would distract him. i mean, a troubled economy has to distract him whether or not he actually focuses on it is another question. much of these last few months we
is the growth not of the military- industrial complex but the security state and has many attributes that polite as never talked about. it is this massive system that nobody wants to reduce so continues to expand. president obama has given them more and more power. when people have challenged it, the obama administration comes in and argues that they will keep the evidence from the court so that you cannot try the case because they will just declare everything a state secret with they have done. it is the worst possible situation. when you look back at eisenhower, the description he left us with was a lot like our security state. host: a few questions from twitter -- guest: it is both of theirs. we have a wonderful system that was developed by a genius, james madison. he created a system of tripartheid branches that notably do not have enough power to govern alone. that was the key of the madisonian austin. we have one branch now this government alone. you cannot be too surprised about congress which has a terrible record on civil liberties and protecting the constitution but the last three or f
. obama, who was 14 when the war ended, the u.s. appeared to have escaped the deficit legacy of vietnam that clouded politics for generations. if mr. hagel is confirmed, the three most prominent figures apart from the president in the countries foreign policy debates -- mr. kerry in the state department, mr. hagel at the pentagon, and mr. mccain, will all derive a substantial part of their legitimacy from vietnam experiences. mr. mccain's relationship with mr. kerr it isy the striking tale of the lingering influence of the vietnam. more than a decade later, mccain traveled to massachusetts to campaign against mr. kerry. yet the pair worked so closely in the cause of reviving relations with vietnam that they became friends. when mr. kerry appeared at a senate confirmation hearing last week, he was introduced by mr. mccain, who praised his ' exemplary statesmanship.' mr. mccain's relationship with mr. hagel what has gone the opposite way. 'i admire him and consider is friendship to be a treasure of inestimable value to me,' mr. mccain said in 2001. by the time mr. mccain became the presid
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)